Archive for the ‘weekly magazines’ Category

Girls in champagne glasses

August 2, 2020

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What is it about women celebrities sitting in champagne glasses? The US actress Goldie Hawn was shown in a champagne coupe by photographer Arny Freytag for the cover of Playboy magazine in January 1985. But she’s not the first, and probably won’t be the last, actress to be so portrayed.

Below, we have Kylie Minogue on the cover of fashion monthly Vogue in a suitably celebratory Christmas shot by Nick Knight as the ‘Princess of Pop’ (December 2003).

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And Demi Moore was never one to be left out in the leggy glamour stakes, so took to the cover of the Observer Magazine (7 October 2007) after her divorce from Bruce Willis. This looks more like a glass globe seat than a champagne glass, but the look is very similar.

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And here’s a variation on the idea, going back 105 years. This 1915 cover of women’s weekly Home Notes was painted by no less than Mabel Lucie Attwell (May 29). Atwell’s cute toddlers were a favourite around the home on china and all sorts of goods for much of the 20th century.

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Mabel Lucie Attwell painted this 1915 cover of Home Notes with a cherub perched on a glass cup of custard

Finally, another illustration. This leering toff appeared inside the issues of the men’s monthly pocket magazine Razzle in the late 1940s, with a girl bubbling away in his glass.

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How to spot a magazine reproduction

July 12, 2020
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Letterpress impression on this 1866 issue of Sharpe’s London magazine is clear

Country Life, Women’s Weekly, Time Out, The Face – all magazines that have published reproductions of their first issue. In the case of the latter two, the fact that they are celebratory facsimiles is made clear, but there is no such indication in the others.

So, if you’re buying a copy of Country Life that seems to be a first issue from 1897 or a premier Women’s Weekly from 1911, you need to watch out for clues, because the real thing is worth far more than a repro.

As I mentioned in a post about buying and selling copies of Country Life magazine, the giveaway is the printing technique. Most magazines before 1950 will have been printed letterpress, with gravure for big run titles between about 1930 and 1990. With letterpress, the metal type is raised and often makes an impression on the paper.

The scan at the top of this page shows the detail from a copy of Sharpe’s London magazine from 1866. The impression from the printing of the reverse page can be clearly seen. This is a particularly obvious example and better techniques as the century progressed greatly reduced the excess pressure, so it’s unlikely to be this clear.

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Facsimile of first Woman’s Weekly

The first issues of both Country Life and Women’s Weekly were letterpress, so should show some signs of the impression of the type on the pages. Modern copies using offset lithography will be perfectly smooth.

 

Also, the real issues are unlikely to be in good condition. Women’s Weekly was printed on newsprint, which will have turned brown and brittle because of the acid in the woodpulp paper. The facsimiles are printed on brown paper, but the colouring is very even, which will not be the case with the real thing, because these usually brown from the outer edges in.

Country Life is tricker in this regard because it was printed on good paper, but it will have picked up dirt. Finally, the staples will have discoloured the paper on the centre pages and will probably have rusted, particularly on Women’s Weekly.

So, if you’re selling one of these, be careful in your description. If you’re buying, ask about the provenance. If in doubt, assume it’s a repro.

Black and white artists in London Opinion

March 5, 2020
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London Opinion cover, dated 11 April 1908

London Opinion was a popular weekly magazine of the Edwardian period that was heavily illustrated by various black and white artists, such as Alfred ‘Your Country Needs You’ Leete and Bert ‘Are a Mo, Kaiser’ Thomas. This cover, dated 11 April 1908, is signed, but heaven knows what the signature says!

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The cover by the unknown illustrator is unusual in that it combines both line illustration and halftone. The halftone reproduction is reserved for the face.

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Halftone reproduction is only used for the face on this London Opinion cover

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At this stage, Leete does not appear to be one of the star illustrators, though he was regularly doing covers by 1914 when he did the Kitchener image that became the famous recruiting poster. He has at least three illustrations in this 1908 issue, judging by his signature with its dropped ‘T’.

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Alfred Leete’s signature can be seen on this cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

When ‘Put-U-Up’ was a trade mark

March 1, 2020

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‘Put-U-Up’ is one of those expressions that’s a household phrase to me for a folding bed, but, as this pre-war colour advert shows, it was an actual brand, made in Clapton, east London.

The full-page advert is from a 1939 copy of the tabloid-sized Illustrated, one of the biggest-selling weekly magazines at the time. It was a rival of Picture Post, and later John Bull, when the latter adopted colour after the war. Its sales at the time will have been about a million copies a week. Illustrated was printed in Watford for its Covent Garden-based publisher, Odhams Press. It closed in 1957, a time when magazines were losing advertising revenue and readers to commercial television.

> General weekly magazines

 

Magazine cover tricks: upside-down faces

January 15, 2020
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Punch horror special from 1973: turn your screen upside-down!

Faces that can be turned upside-down to make another face have long been an illustrated  postcard gimmick, such as a Kaiser Bill card from World War I. They’re rarer on magazine covers, but here’s a Punch effort from 1973 for a horror special issue of the satirical weekly.

>>More cover design secrets

‘New Women in a New World’

January 1, 2020
Home Notes magazine cover in 1910 had high hoped for 'New Women in a New World'

Home Notes in 1910 had high hopes for ‘New Women in a New World’

Let’s just keep the New Year celebrations going. Here’s how the women’s weekly Home Notes saw things in 1910 – ‘New Women in a New World’.

The first decade of the 20th century witnessed the growth of the women’s suffrage movement. In 1903, Emmeline Pankhurst had founded the Women’s Social and Political Union. As feminist frustrations grew during the decade, suffragettes turned to smashing windows in Downing Street, mass demonstrations, and in 1909 prison hunger strikes. There were high hopes in 1910 that the Conciliation bill would give the vote to a million property-owning women, but it did not become law. In November, suffragettes marched on parliament, where they were brutally treated by police on ‘Black Friday’.

Christmas in magazines: 1904-1980

December 24, 2019
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A portly Christmas pudding for the Penny Magazine by Lawson Wood

Lawson Wood would have been 26 when he was commissioned to draw this Christmas number cover of the Penny Magazine in 1904. He would later become famous the world over for his drawings of dinosaurs, animals and, most famous of all, Gran’pop, which appeared in the Sketch. There’s always humour in his work, as demonstrated by the smiling face of the rotund man with his even more rotund pudding (in contrast to Wood’s unusually skinny monogram!).

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New Illustrated shows a girl in snow fox fur

It wasn’t until the 1990s that fur became a dirty word and this New Illustrated cover from December 6, 1919 shows a girl in snow fox fur. New Illustrated had adopted the photogravure printing process in April that year and, at the end of the war, had changed its name from War Illustrated. It was less successful with another change of name, to Record Weekly, and closed in 1920. The cover was by Harry Woolley.

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Fry’s Magazine of Sport portrays a traditional coach in 1913

Lawson Wood also drew for Fry’s Magazine, though this unsigned traditional coaching image doesn’t look like one of his.  

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John Bull portrays British and French generals toasting entente in 1914

Christmas 1914 would not have been much fun on the Western Front, even if peace did break out for a legendary day of football on parts of the line. But John Bull editor Horatio Bottomley – who would be shamed a decade later as a champagne-swigging con artist – chose to celebrate the Entente Cordiale between Britain and France with Kitchener among the generals of the two nations.  Notice how delicately they all hold their flutes.

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Christmas cheer at the front in 1918, according to the Christmas Pearson’s

An optimistic Pearson’s Christmas at the front in 1918, just weeks after the Armistice was signed. Again the cover was not signed, but the artist has made very good use of the limited range of colours. Note the free distribution for magazines sent to the troops and navy.

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Christmas is a merry time for the gent and his parcel-carrying lad on the right of this Howard Elcock masthead for Bystander in 1925, but the woman who is the focus of the image is still looking for something. The main feature promoted above the titlepiece is by Basil MacDonald Hastings, who would die three years later, aged just 46. His son ‘Mac’ would make his name as a war correspondent on Picture Post, before editing the Strand from 1945 until it closed in 1950, and then going on to be a roving reporter for the Eagle comic. He married Anne Scott-James, the Harper’s Bazaar editor and newspaper columnist. One of their children, Max, followed in the family footsteps to become editor of the Daily Telegraph and London Evening Standard.

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The Observer’s colour supplement celebrates a century of comics in 1974 (December 22)

This 1974 Observer Sunday newspaper supplement cover celebrates a century of comics, though it is dominated by two relatively new characters in the comics pantheon, Corky the Cat and Desperate Dan, who both appeared in the Dandy from its launch in 1937. In fact, they all look like Dandy characters. Also, I’m not sure why 1874 is the starting date, with Ally Sloper’s Half Holiday of 1884 often being regarded as the first comic, with Ally Sloper first appearing as a strip in 1867.

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The BBC’s Listener has a Bruegel parody by Peter Brookes (1980, December 18)

Peter Brookes has a long, clever history of reinterpreting magazine covers and paintings in his cartoons and illustrations. This 1980 Listener cover takes Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow and replaces the hunters with a BBC detector van and a team of men setting out to identify houses where the TV watchers had not paid their BBC licences. The Listener was published by the BBC and the cover can been seen as taking a dig at the corporation because the detector vans were disliked (and possibly ineffective). In 2016, the Guardian said on its Facebook page:

For years, enforcement has relied on the scary idea of ‘detector vans’ in our streets, but we still don’t know for sure if they actually exist.

Detector vans or not, the BBC gets my cash every year (unlike the Guardian, which I’ve given up on since it gave up covering a broad range of news – though the BBC shows every sign of following the Guardian‘s news-light, celebrity-heavy strategy to attract US readers).

This is one of several Christmas cover posts I’m putting up.

More Christmas goodies: self-referential Christmas magazine covers.

 


To see almost 500 magazine covers and pages, look out for my book, A History of British Magazine Design, from the Victoria & Albert Museum, the world’s leading museum of art and design


Father Christmas in magazines

December 23, 2019
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A 1910 Sunday Companion page showed Father Christmas with holly and mistletoe

Father Christmas gives an early seasonal message on this Sunday Companion magazine page from 26th November 1910. His speech culminates with the message:

On my rounds on Christmas Eve there is no place I feel more happy in than a railway station. I look with delight on the happy, flushed faces and the bright eyes of the young travellers. And when I say, “Where are you going?” I listen for the glad reply, “I’m going home for Christmas.” Home for Christmas! What music is in the words! It spells welcome! It spells reunion, it spells meeting after long absence.

“Home, home! Sweet, sweet home!
There’s no place like home!”

No, ladies and gentlemen, there is no place like home on Christmas night.

The Sunday Companion had started life in 1860 as Good Words and Sunday Magazine, with a focus on illustrated religious articles under Norman Macleod, a minister. Alfred Harmsworth’s Amalgamated Press had taken it over in 1905 and relaunched it under the new name.

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Sunday Companion’s actual Christmas number (10 December) showed the Mistletoe Queen

Sunday Companion‘s December 10 Christmas number showed the Mistletoe Queen. Note the credit for the editors, Hartley Aspden and Arthur Burnage, at the bottom of the cover.

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Cavalcade from 18 December 1937 showing George Lansbury MP as Father Christmas

Cavalcade was one of two news weeklies launched in the early 1930s. This 1937 cover shows George Lansbury, who had led the Labour Party in 1932-35, as Father Christmas. Lansbury was a social reformer. He had supported the suffragettes in 1912 and helped start the Daily Herald newspaper, becoming editor in 1913. In 1925, he launched the short-lived Lansbury’s Labour Weekly. In 1931, after Labour was ousted, Lansbury returned to parliament and won the party’s leadership in opposition. However, his pacifist views led to him losing support after Mussolini invaded Abyssinia. Lansbury resigned as leader and spent the last few years of his life trying to prevent another war, going as far as having talks with Adolf Hitler. He died in 1940.

The Men Only cover below from December 1963 is a rather different take on Santa.

Men Only magazine front cover from December 1963

Men Only magazine cover from December 1963

This is one of several Christmas cover posts I’m putting up.

More Christmas goodies: self-referential Christmas magazine covers.

Christmas magazines: bring on the clowns

December 21, 2019
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Scary stuff: Grock the Clown on the cover of Pictorial Weekly, 12 December 1934

Clowns were a central part of Christmas for most of the last century, but many of the images of them now look grotesque and have even developed a sinister air. This Pictorial Weekly cover showing Grock ‘the King of Clowns’ is a case in point (12 December 1934).

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Blighty magazine’s cheery 1947 Christmas cover by ‘SIM”

Blighty, which had been a free weekly magazine for the forces during two world wars, has a much cheerier Christmas cover with a fancy dress clown and his leggy girlfriend under the mistletoe (6 December 1947). Note the other characters, with a cowboy and Red Indian chief of the era, and a harlequin – all popular party costumes.

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Bill Ballantine, a US clown, on a 1949 Leader magazine cover (October15)

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A 1945 Leader cover (December 29)

The clown photograph on the cover of The Leader, a family news weekly dated 15 October 1949, lies somewhere between the first two covers on the creepy scale. ‘Old clowns never die’ is the cover line and the image by US photographer George Karger shows Bill Ballantine in his clown make-up.

Ballantine was a US journalist who served in England during World War II at the Office of War Information on propaganda leaflets. In 1947 he joined the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus in the US as a clown. In 1969 he became the first dean of the Clown College in Florida.

The monochrome clown photograph on the cover of The Leader, dates from December 29 in 1945. Wartime restrictions on the use of paper and ink were still in force then and British magazines were slow to move over to colour. The clowns feature is by Gladys Bronwyn Stern a popular and prolific novelist and literary critic, best known for her Matriarch series. Her first book was published in 1920, the last in 1964.

The Answers weekly ran a 1951 feature based on the clowns at Tom Arnold’s Harringay circus in London. The annual circus ran for eleven seasons from Christmas 1947 to Christmas 1957. This clown will be part of Chocolat & Co, an act by The Rastellis, one of  the longest-running clown families in circus history. According to Circopedia, The Rastellis performed from the early 1930s until 2002. At the bottom of the page in a Tom Arnold souvenir programme from 1953.

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‘Here comes the clown’ cover feature from Answers (December 29, 1951)

 

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Harringay circus souvenir programme from 1953

This is one of several Christmas cover posts I’m putting up.

More Christmas goodies: self-referential Christmas magazine covers.

A magazine for Christmas

December 19, 2019
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Subscription promotion for the Spectator magazine

Done all your Christmas shopping? Or are you still looking for a present? Magazines and books are a good option, particularly because you can get them delivered.

As the Spectator flyer above shows, a subscription can be ordered lasting from just a few weeks to match a limited budget rather than the usual year or more. As well as that legendary title – it’s been published continuously since 1828 – there’s the quintessentially English Country Life. There are also magazines for just about every county, such as Cheshire LifeMagazines Direct offers dozens of titles and Exact Editions provides digital issues (and archive access) from the UK and around the world.

Among the popular independent magazines, Little White Lies is a cult movie magazine with great writing and illustration at £27 for a year’s worth of five issues; Delayed Gratification is my personal favourite (single issues for £12 or subs from £26); or a Stack subscription ensures someone gets a different title every month.

oz-magazine-cover-1967-bob-dylanOne option is a classic issue from eBay or Amazon with a spectacular cover or an article of particular interest to your recipient. These can be had from a few pence for the last issue of NME; to hundreds of pounds, such as this Oz Dylan issue from 1967; and even thousands, such as a July 1915 copy of the Vorticist magazine Blast with its images by Wyndham Lewis and poems by Ezra Pound.

And, of course, there’s a magazine – whether classic or modern – for every hobby, pastime or sport, from film to cycling to collecting.

It’s a similar story for books, and Magforum has a list of books about magazines that you can search for on sites such as Abe books, eBay and Amazon. As for modern editions, Nova 1965 – 1975 celebrating the original ‘thinking woman’s magazine’ and compiled by David Hillman and Harri Peccinotti has recently been reissued at £26. It’s a classic. 

Find out more …