The week in magazines

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Bharbat Gula with the National Geographic  cover in 2002

Bharbat Gula, the Afghan refugee whose face made one of the world’s iconic magazine covers, has been arrested for living illegally in Pakistan with fraudulent documents.

She was 12 years old when Steve McCurry took her photograph at a refugee camp close to the Afghan border in 1984. The National Geographic cover was dated June the following year.

The cover may have sold magazines and made McCurry’s name, but it did nothing for her. She had never even seen it until he tracked her down almost 20 years later (left).

Now, she’s caught up in the drive by the Pakistani authorities to force the millions of Afghan refugees in the country to return home.

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NME is one of the biggest magazine brands

AT&T announced a takeover offer in the US with Time Warner. The ‘Time’ in Time Warner is, of course, the US news magazine founded in 1923.

TW one of the world’s biggest media companies and is itself the result of two mergers – Time magazines and Warner films, and then internet provider AOL and Time Warner. The latter was supposed to be about provided old media content to a fast-growing dotcom star, but it bombed, hence the dropping of the AOL.

Today, the jewel in the crown is HBO, maker of Game of Thrones and getting together with AT&T is again about providing content to a massive broadband and mobile distributor.

In all the press coverage, though, one part of TW has barely rated a mention – Time Inc UK, once called IPC, and once a force to be reckoned with as Britain’s biggest magazine publisher. However, they’ve sold off the Blue Fin building in Southwark to rent it back to themselves, boosting the balance sheet in the short term, but costing the company in the long term. UK magazines are an insignificant bauble in a company the merger values at $65bn.

The Liverpool Echo launched a free monthly magazine, Business Post on Thursday.

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Home Chat and Winnie-the-Pooh in 1928

AA Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh is celebrating the publication of his first collection of stories 90 years ago.

The honey-loving bear was used for a big marketing campaign by Home Chat in 1928 and one of the six EH Shepard colour plates commissioned for that campaign was sold recently for £68,500.

Milne was a prolific contributor of articles and stories to magazines, dating as far back as 1903 with ‘The Rape of the Sherlock’, one of the first parodies of Conan Doyle’s famous detective, for Thomas Bowles’s Vanity Fair. Milne was just 21 at the time.

Sally Brampton, founding editor of Elle in the UK aged just 30, was declared by an inquest to have died from suicide. That launch was half her lifetime ago, and she had since suffered from depression, an issue she wrote about in a book, Shoot the Damn Dog. In recent years, she had written an advice column for the Daily Mail.

 

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